Data Guidance

The Sport England Local Sport Profiles Tool contains locally available data on a range of topics including:

  1. Demographics - Data relating to the demographic nature and physical geography of the area.
  2. Health - Data on the health of the local population.
  3. Participation - Statistics on the participation of adults in sporting and recreation activities.
  4. Sporting Facilities - Numbers of, and ownership of, facilities in the local area and Clubmarked accredited clubs.
  5. Economy - Data on local sport businesses, new business activity, employment and financial performance.
  6. Neighbours - Comparisons with nearest local authority statistical neighbours (based on the CIPFA model) and Core Cities.

While information is available at the lower tier local authority level, due to sample sizes in some datasets, it is also appropriate to investigate the profiles of the broader geographies that contain these lower tier local authorities (i.e. counties) to examine trends on a larger scale.

Demographics

Please note that all population data in this section is given in thousands (000s)

Demographic characteristics

Data is drawn from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Annual Population Survey 2010, 2013, and 2016, except for 0 to 13 and 14 to 15 population figures which are from Mid-Year Population Estimates 2010, 2013, and 2015.

Demographics: 16 + age bands, gender, ethnicity, disability:

The tables provide demographic information on the population of the selected area. Count and proportion of population is broken down by age group (0 to 13, 14 to 15, 16 to 19, 20 to 24, 25 to 34, 35 to 49, 50 to 64, 65+), gender, and ethnicity (White British or BME).  Please note that some survey respondents chose not to answer the question on ethnicity; therefore, total counts may display small differences when compared with total 16+ population. The current disability status of the adult population (16+) in the local area who are in employment, of working age, looking for work, or wanting regular employment (as defined by the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA)) is also included. DDA disabled (current disability) includes those who have a long-term disability which substantially limits their day-to-day activities. Work-limiting disabled includes those who have a long-term disability which affects the kind or amount of work they might do. Please note that the Annual Population Survey has been used for this table because it allows detailed demographic breakdowns for local authority areas and is therefore the most appropriate data source. The Active People Survey uses data from ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates, so marginal differences in participation numbers could be noted when factoring participation rates against different population figures.

Demographics: 0 to 13 and 14 to 15 population:

Estimated population figures for those aged under 16 are not included in the Annual Population Survey and have therefore been sourced from Mid-Year Population Estimates (2010, 2013, 2015). The annual release of the Mid-Year Population Estimates does not coincide with the release of the Sport England Local Sport Profile update. In order to show the most recent data for the majority of population demographics (mostly sourced from the Annual Population Survey), other demographic breakdowns in this table are for 2010, 2013, and 2016; however, the most recent data release for MYPE is 2015. As the most up-to-date data, this has been included in the table and is clearly marked to differentiate it from 2016 figures.

Unemployment as a proportion of economically active population

Unemployment count and economically active count for the adult population (those aged 16 and over). The unemployment rate is calculated as a proportion of the economically active population. Unemployed includes all people who are not in work and are actively seeking a job, regardless of whether they are claiming unemployment-related benefits. Economically active includes unemployed and those in employment (employed and self-employed). Data is drawn from the ONS Annual Population Survey 2016.

Short and long term unemployment

Number and proportion of unemployed people who have been out of work for less than 6 months, or longer than 6 months, in their current episode of unemployment. Data is from the ONS Annual Population Survey 2016.

Deprivation levels as measured by the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD)

The Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) 2015 provides a gauge as to how deprived an area is. Local authorities are given a rank out of 353 (the total number of lower tier and upper tier local authorities). The lower the score and higher the rank, the less deprived an area is compared with other areas in England. Each local authority also receives a rank within their region, allowing levels of deprivation to be compared for local authorities in the same region.

16-18 year olds not in education, employment or training (NEET)

The number and proportion of 16-18 year olds living in each local authority area who are not in education, employment or training (NEET). Employment is expected to include training leading to a recognised qualification at NQF Level 2 or above; young people in employment without such training are counted as NEET. Data is reported to DfE by local authorities (previously, the Connexions careers advisory service for young people was responsible for data collection). A direct national comparator is not available; participation figures for the whole of England are calculated using a different methodology. Data is not available at district level; data for the relevant county is shown instead.

Employed adult population (16+) by gross income (000s)

This table shows the adult population (16+) who are employed or on a government scheme, split by salary band. Figures are not directly comparable with those used in previous iterations of the profile due to the implementation of a new methodology with improved representation of the working population. The data source is the Annual Population Survey 2016.

Adult population of working age or in employment by highest qualification (000s)

This table shows the adult population (aged 16 - 69) and adults in employment who are above working age (i.e. aged 70 - 99 with qualifications), split by highest qualification attained. The data source is the Annual Population Survey 2016. Figures are not directly comparable with those used in previous iterations of the profile due to the implementation of a new methodology with improved representation of the surveyed adult population.

For more information, please visit:
https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/articles/916.aspx

Population projections (2014-2020)

The data shows the projected population change in each local authority area for each year between 2014 and 2020. Sub national population projections are broken down by age categories (0-4, 5-9, etc.) and gender. This data was released by ONS in 2014 and is based on 2013 population estimates. Please note that estimates have been revised by ONS since previous versions of the profile.

Health

Overweight adults and childhood obesity

This table shows the number of people and the proportion of the adult population who are overweight or obese, and the number and proportion of children in Year 6 who are classified as obese.

Data on adults was obtained from the Public Health England's Public Health Profiles 2016, and relates to the period from mid-January 2013 to mid-January 2016. PHE used figures from the Active People Survey (APS7 quarter 2 to APS10 quarter 1). The table shows the number of adults with a BMI classified as overweight (including obese), calculated from adjusted height and weight variables. Adults are defined as overweight (including obese) if their body mass index (BMI) is greater than or equal to 25kg/m2. This data is not directly comparable with previous versions of the profile as it uses a new definition of "excess weight" which includes BMI <25kg/m2. We previously published obesity prevalence data for BMI <30g/m2. The new definition of "excess weight" is the measure included in the Public Health Outcomes Framework.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.noo.org.uk/visualisation

Data on childhood obesity was obtained from the Department of Health's 2016 Public Health Profile and relates to the period 2014/15. This indicator measures the number of children in Year 6 with a valid height and weight measured by the NCMP with a BMI classified as obese.

For childhood obesity, City of London totals have been combined with Hackney and Isles of Scilly totals with Cornwall UA to prevent potential disclosure of individuals.

http://www.noo.org.uk/LA/obesity_prev/child

Life expectancy by gender

Life expectancy shows the average age both males and females can expect to live to. Data was obtained from the Public Health England Health Profiles 2015 which drew on data from 2012-2014. The Health Profiles can be found at:

http://www.apho.org.uk/default.aspx?QN=P_HEALTH_PROFILES

Premature mortality

This indicator shows the number of adults dying before the age of 75 in the selected area as an age-standardised rate which takes into account the fact that mortality rates are higher among older age groups. Data is from Public Health England's Longer Lives model, which draws on data from 2012-2014. A per 100,000 rate is unavailable for England. Data is unavailable at regional and LEP level.

The Longer Lives model can be found at:

http://longerlives.phe.org.uk/

Preventable deaths by hypothetical level of physical activity among 40-79 year olds

This table estimates the number of deaths from certain diseases which might have been prevented among 40-79 year olds given different levels of physical activity among the population. Data is from Public Health England's Health Impact of Physical Inactivity (HIPI) tool. The tool provides estimates of:

  • preventable cases of diabetes (for Counties and Unitary Authorities)
  • preventable emergency admissions to hospital with a coronary heart disease
  • preventable new cases of breast and colon cancer

Health costs of physical inactivity

Sport England commissioned the British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group at Oxford University to prepare estimates of the primary and secondary care costs attributable to physical inactivity for Primary Care Trusts (PCT) across England for 2009/10, updating the data prepared by the same Group for the Department of Health for 2006/07. The results based on 2009/10 demonstrate average healthcare costs of physical inactivity for each PCT of £6.2million.

The health care costs of physical inactivity were provided for each PCT and we estimated figures for local authorities using the population within each local authority as a proxy to understand how much of an LA belongs to each PCT

These estimates are a starting point in understanding the costs of physical inactivity in a particular area. The five disease areas used in this estimate contribute a smaller proportion than the true total value of diseases related to physical inactivity. Other important NHS disease areas were not included in this estimate (due to a lack of population attributable fractions). These include obesity, musculoskeletal health, mental health and functional health. This means that the true costs are likely to be much higher.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.apho.org.uk/resource/view.aspx?RID=123459

Physically active and inactive adults

This table shows the number and proportion of adults aged 16+ who are physically active or inactive, based on Public Health England's definition. Physically active adults include those doing at least 150 "equivalent" minutes of at least moderate intensity physical activity per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more in the previous 28 days, while inactive adults include those doing less than 30 "equivalent" minutes of at least moderate intensity physical activity per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more in the previous 28 days. Note that this measure differs from Sport England's definitions of 'physically active' and 'physically inactive'. The data relates to 2015 and is from the Public Health Outcomes Framework, which can be accessed at:

http://www.phoutcomes.info/

Local authority public health allocations

The data shows the funding allocated to local authorities as ring-fenced grants for public health services in 2014/15 and 2015/16. Allocations are for upper tier authorities. For districts the county's allocation is shown. Please note that the figures in the table may display marginal differences in totals due to rounding. Figures for 2016/17 have been revised since the previous release of the profile.

At the beginning of the 2015/16 period the total grant to England amounted originally to circa £2.8 billion. This was then supplemented by a further £430 million when responsibility for services for children aged 0 – 5 transferred to LAs from NHS England on 1 October.

On 4 June 2015 the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that £200 million was to be saved from the public health grant as part of the plan to reduce the public debt. The final figures included in this profile for 2016/17 now include the funding for services for children aged 0-5 with the £200 million reduction across England taken into account. As a result of these governmental changes, figures for 2015/16 are not directly comparable with previous years.

Clinical Commissioning Group allocations

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) were introduced by the 2012 Health and Social Care Act, and largely replaced Primary Care Trusts which ceased to exist in April 2013 (some PCT staff moved to Public Health teams). NHS funding allocations are regularly revised. The table includes funding allocations to CCGs in 2014/15, 2015/16 (allocation published in December 2014), and 2016/17 (final allocation after place based pace of change - published December 2015). Please note that due to funding revisions, 2015/16 figures may differ from those stated in previous iterations of the profile.

In 2015 Gateshead CCG, Newcastle North & East CCG, and Newcastle West CCG merged to become Newcastle Gateshead CCG. Figures for 2015/16 and 2016/17 include allocations for this new CCG.

Participation

Please note when referring to Active People Survey data, the latest data point (labelled 2015/16, or 2014/16) is up to September 2016 (APS10 Q4). This covers the period Oct 2015-Sept 2016, or Oct 2014 - Sept 2016 respectively.

Adult (16+) participation in Sport (at least once a week) by year and demographic groups

This indicator is Sport England’s measure of sports activities across the population. It provides a measure of participation in at least 4 sessions of moderate intensity for at least 30 minutes in the previous 28 days, which is the equivalent of at least one session per week. The overall participation rate is tracked over time using each iteration of the Active People Survey (APS1 through APS10).

Please also note that the latest results now include:

  • Moderate intensity participation in a full range of keepfit classes amongst people aged 14-65 years (previously for some keepfit classes, results had only included participation amongst people aged 65 years or over)
  • Moderate intensity participation in bowls and croquet (previously participation in these activities had only been included for people aged 65 years or over)
  • All recreational cycling (previously infrequent recreational cycling - less than once a week - had not been included)

For comparison purposes, these changes have been consistently applied to results for the entire time series.

Each participation rate for APS1 and APS10 is broken down further by key demographic information such as gender, ethnicity, age, disability and socio-economic class. In some instances the sample size is too small in a given area for certain breakdowns and these figures are suppressed.

Adult (14+) Participation in Sport (at least once a week)

This table shows participation in at least 4 sessions of moderate intensity for at least 30 minutes in the previous 28 days (the equivalent of at least one session per week) among the population aged 14+.

Please also note that the latest results now include:

  • Moderate intensity participation in a full range of keepfit classes amongst people aged 14-65 years (previously for some keepfit classes, results had only included participation amongst people aged 65 years or over)
  • Moderate intensity participation in bowls and croquet (previously participation in these activities had only been included for people aged 65 years or over)
  • All recreational cycling (previously infrequent recreational cycling - less than once a week - had not been included)

For comparison purposes, these changes have been consistently applied to results for the entire time series.

Adult (16+) (Formerly NI8) participation by year, duration and demographic groups

Adult (16+) (formerly NI8) participation from the Active People Survey is a measure of the number of days of adult (16+) participation in at least moderate intensity sport or active recreation lasting at least 30 minutes over the last four weeks. From this, the indicators used in this profile of 3x30, 1-2x30 and 0x30 are derived. They are defined as follows:

  • 3x30 - NI8 = 3 or more times a week (or 12 or more days over the last 4 weeks)
  • 1-2x30 = between 1 and 2 times a week (or 1-11 days over the last 4 weeks)
  • 0x30 = 0 times a week (no 30 minute moderate intensity sessions)

Each participation rate is broken down by key demographic groups. In some instances the sample size is too small in a given area for a certain breakdown and these figures are not shown and are instead displayed as *. The chart shows a graphical representation of the 3x30 - NI8 indicator (i.e. 3 or more times a week).

Please also note that the latest results now include:

  • Moderate intensity participation in a full range of keepfit classes amongst people aged 14-65 years (previously for some keepfit classes, results had only included participation amongst people aged 65 years or over)
  • Moderate intensity participation in bowls and croquet (previously participation in these activities had only been included for people aged 65 years or over)
  • All recreational cycling (previously infrequent recreational cycling - less than once a week - had not been included)

For comparison purposes, these changes have been consistently applied to results for the entire time series.

To find out more about the Active People Survey please click on the following link to our website:
http://www.sportengland.org/research/about-our-research/what-is-the-active-people-survey/

Key Performance Indicators (KPI)

KPI 3, 4 and 5 are available for APS1 – APS10 (2005/06 to 2015/16), whilst KPI6 is only available for APS1 to 4 (2005/06 to 2009/10) and for APS7 (2012/13) – APS10 (2015/16). KPI6 was not measured in APS5 or APS6. For APS6 (2011/12) these questions were asked to half of the survey sample, which means that there is an insufficient sample to provide results for all of the KPIs.

KPI3 - Club Membership in the last 4 weeks: This shows the percentage of the adult (16+) population who are a member of a club where they have done sport in the last four weeks.

KPI4 - Received tuition / coaching in last 12 months: This shows the percentage of the adult (16+) population who have received any tuition from an instructor or coach to improve their performance in any sport or recreational physical activity in the last 12 months.

KPI5 - Took part in organised competition in last 12 months: This shows the percentage of the adult (16+) population who have taken part in any organised competition in the last 12 months.

KPI6 - Satisfaction with local provision: This shows the percentage of the adult population who are satisfied with sports provision in their local area (defined as responding very or fairly satisfied).

Volunteering - At least one hour a week of volunteering to support sport: This shows the percentage of the adult (16+) population who have volunteered at least one hour a week to support sport. Please note that at the start of APS5 the volunteering question was changed to incorporate a wider definition of sport volunteering therefore, comparisons to previous data should not be made.

Market segmentation

Sport England has developed nineteen sporting segments to understand the nation's attitudes and motivations – why they play sport and why they don’t. The segments provide the knowledge to influence people to take part. Each segment can be explored at differing geographic levels. It is possible to find out what people's sporting habits are in a particular street, community, local authority or region. The table shows each of the segments ranked by those that are most likely to be found in the selected area down to those least likely to be found with the proportion of the population that they represent in that area given. Please note that this data is the 2010 market segmentation data. For further information on either of the market segmentation studies, please visit Sport England’s Research pages at:

http://segments.sportengland.org/querySegments.aspx

Please note that the figures in the table may display marginal differences in totals due to rounding.

Top sports in the local area (with regional and national comparison)

This table shows the top participation sports in the selected geography based on participation at least once per month (any duration or intensity). Data is from APS10 (2015/16). Where possible the top 5 sports in the local area are shown; however, due to small sample sizes, some or all of the figures may be suppressed.

For comparison purposes, the table also gives the corresponding regional and national percentage of people participating in the sport.

Top sports by local area are based on the assumption that these are aligned to those sports which have the highest participation nationally, so data has only been run for those sports which have the highest participation at national level.

Latent Demand

Since the start of APS2 (2007/8) the Active People Survey has asked, ‘Thinking about the future, over the next 12 months, would you like to do more sport or recreational physical activity than you do at the moment?’ This question is asked of half the sample, and has been termed ‘latent demand’.

Latent demand – all adults

The proportion/number of adults (aged 16 and over) who would like to do more (of the) sport over the next 12 months than they currently do.

Latent demand – active adults

The proportion/number of adults (aged 16 and over) who would like to do more (of the) sport over the next 12 months than they currently do AND have participated in at least one session of (the) sport, at any intensity or duration, in the last 28 days.

Latent demand – inactive adults

The proportion/number of adults (aged 16 and over) who would like to do more (of the) sport over the next 12 months than they currently do AND have not participated in any sessions of (the) sport, at any intensity or duration, in the last 28 days.

Sporting Facilities

Number of facilities by type

This table provides a snapshot of the numbers of facilities of each type in the selected area and what proportion this represents of all the facilities of that type in the region. Data is taken from Active Places, January 2015. Please note this data is snapshot at a particular point in time. Other sources, such as Active Places Power, may show different records as updates are made on a weekly basis.

For the purposes of this profile, all operational facilities are included, including those under construction and temporarily closed. Facilities that are planned OR permanently closed are not included. Where multiple ‘grass pitches’, ‘artificial grass pitches’, ‘tennis courts’, or ‘squash courts’ are located on the same site, they are counted as individual facilities i.e. a school with 3 tennis courts would be counted as 3 distinct sports facilities.

Access types of sporting facilities

This table provides information on facilities within a local authority area that are available for public and private use. Open for use by the public includes pay and play, registered membership, club use and sports club / community associations. Private includes facilities that are not available for public use as set out above. Data is from Active Places, January 2015.

For the purposes of this profile, all operational facilities are included, including those under construction and temporarily closed. Facilities that are planned OR permanently closed are not included. Where multiple 'grass pitches', 'artificial grass pitches', 'tennis courts', or 'squash courts' are located on the same site, they are counted as individual facilities i.e. a school with 3 tennis courts would be counted as 3 distinct sports facilities.

Ownership types of sporting facilities by local authority area

This table provides details on ownership type of different facilities within a local authority area. Facilities are owned by all types of organisations including commercial, educational, local authorities, sports clubs and others (e.g. Government, Ministry of Defence, Industry). Data is from Active Places, January 2015.

For the purposes of this profile, all operational facilities are included, including those under construction and temporarily closed. Facilities that are planned OR permanently closed are not included. Multiple grass pitches, artificial grass pitches, tennis courts, and squash courts that are situated on the same site are counted as individual facilities i.e. a school with 3 tennis courts would be counted as 3 distinct sports facilities.

% of sports facilities on school sites in the area

This table provides information on the number of sports facilities in the area that are owned by schools by type of facility. The data is from Active Places, January 2015.

For the purposes of this profile, all operational facilities are included, including those under construction and temporarily closed. Facilities that are planned OR permanently closed are not included. Multiple grass pitches, artificial grass pitches, tennis courts, and squash courts that are situated on the same site are counted as individual facilities i.e. a school with 3 tennis courts would be counted as 3 distinct sports facilities.

% of school sports facilities that are currently open for community sports use

This table provides information on the number of sports facilities in the area by facility type that are owned by schools and open for public use. The data is from Active Places, January 2015.

For the purposes of this profile, all operational facilities are included, including those under construction and temporarily closed. Facilities that are planned OR permanently closed are not included. Multiple grass pitches, artificial grass pitches, tennis courts, and squash courts that are situated on the same site are counted as individual facilities i.e. a school with 3 tennis courts would be counted as 3 distinct sports facilities.

Further information on definitions of sports facilities can be found via Sport England'’s Active Places website.

Clubmark clubs by sporting activity type

Clubmark is a cross-sport quality accreditation for clubs with junior sections. There were 15,746 registered Clubmark clubs in January 2014 in England. This table provides a breakdown of the numbers and types of Clubmark clubs in the selected area. This data is dated January 2014.

Economy

Participation and consumption of sports GVA contribution: sports total and by sports participation level (£m)

Data is sourced from Sport England's economic value of sport local model. The figures produce an estimate for the value (or impact) in a single year, 2013.

Note: Due to rounding, lower level geographies may not sum to the higher tier figures provided.

Definitions

Participation is the sports goods and services produced to meet demand from people participating in sports. This includes the manufacture for example of tennis racquets, footballs, golf clubs, that are used for sport; the "added value" of the shops that sell these goods, and of the services and facilities that people use to participate in sports.

Non-participation covers the manufacture and retails of sports equipment and clothes that are not for sports use. It also includes the added value generated by sports clubs that generate income from selling tickets to spectators, TV income or sponsorship, the value added of sports gambling services and of businesses that produce sports television services.

Gross Value Added (GVA) is the sum of wages paid to employees and profits generated by businesses operating in the sports sector within the local area. It is a measure of economic value.

Data sources
  • The National Economic Value of Sport Study (2010 data, updated to reflect 2013 inflation) (AMION for Sport England)
  • Business Register Employment Survey (BRES) (ONS) 2013
  • The Active People Survey (Sport England, APS7/8 , Oct 2012-Oct 2014)
  • Great Britain Travel Survey (GBTS) (VisitEngland) 2013
  • GB Day Visit survey (UKDVS) (VisitEngland) 2013
  • Understanding the value of engagement in culture and sport (DCMS, 2010)
  • ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates (ONS) 2013

To view the Guidance document which accompanies the tool, and to access the local economic tool, click here:
https://www.sportengland.org/research/benefits-of-sport/economic-value-of-sport/

Total sports related jobs (participation and wider non-participation interests)

Data is sourced from Sport England's economic value of sport local model and relates to 2013.

Note: Due to rounding, lower level geographies may not sum to the higher tier figures provided.

Definitions

Participation is the sports goods and services produced to meet demand from people participating in sports. This includes the manufacture for example of tennis racquets, footballs, golf clubs, that are used for sport; the "added value" of the shops that sell these goods, and of the services and facilities that people use to participate in sports.

Non-participation covers the manufacture and retails of sports equipment and clothes that are not for sports use. It also includes the added value generated by sports clubs that generate income from selling tickets to spectators, TV income or sponsorship, the value added of sports gambling services and of businesses that produce sports television services.

Data sources
  • The National Economic Value of Sport Study (2010 data, updated to reflect 2013 inflation) (AMION for Sport England)
  • Business Register Employment Survey (BRES) (ONS) 2013
  • The Active People Survey (Sport England, APS7/8 , Oct 2012-Oct 2014)
  • Great Britain Travel Survey (GBTS) (VisitEngland) 2013
  • GB Day Visit survey (UKDVS) (VisitEngland) 2013
  • Understanding the value of engagement in culture and sport (DCMS, 2010)
  • ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates (ONS) 2013

To view the Guidance document which accompanies the tool, and to access the local economic tool, click here:
https://www.sportengland.org/research/benefits-of-sport/economic-value-of-sport/

Economic value of sports volunteering (£m)

The total economic value of sports volunteering is recorded in this table. Sports volunteering is defined as the amount of volunteering time given over a year, and uses a notional wage to provide an overall value of that time.

Data is sourced from Sport England's economic value of sport local model and relates to 2013.

Note: Due to rounding, lower level geographies may not sum to the higher tier figures provided.

Data sources
  • The National Economic Value of Sport Study (2010 data, updated to reflect 2013 inflation) (AMION for Sport England)
  • Business Register Employment Survey (BRES) (ONS) 2013
  • The Active People Survey (Sport England, APS7/8 , Oct 2012-Oct 2014)
  • Great Britain Travel Survey (GBTS) (VisitEngland) 2013
  • GB Day Visit survey (UKDVS) (VisitEngland) 2013
  • Understanding the value of engagement in culture and sport (DCMS, 2010)
  • ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates (ONS) 2013

To view the Guidance document which accompanies the tool, and to access the local economic tool, click here:
https://www.sportengland.org/research/benefits-of-sport/economic-value-of-sport/

Economic value of health benefits of participating in sports (£m)

The Economic value to the local area of improved quality and length of life plus health care costs avoided due to participation in sports is recorded in this table.

The principal wider benefit of participating in sport is the contribution that it can make to health. This is reflected in a reduction in the costs of treating diseases and improvements to quality of life, both of which can be given monetary values. The estimates are based on research carried out for DCMS and combine two monetary values for improving health; an estimate of the savings that health services will make because people who participate in sport are less likely to suffer from diseases and are also likely to live longer.

Data is sourced from Sport England's economic value of sport local model and relates to 2013.

Note: Due to rounding, lower level geographies may not sum to the higher tier figures provided.

Data sources
  • The National Economic Value of Sport Study (2010 data, updated to reflect 2013 inflation) (AMION for Sport England)
  • Business Register Employment Survey (BRES) (ONS) 2013
  • The Active People Survey (Sport England, APS7/8 , Oct 2012-Oct 2014)
  • Great Britain Travel Survey (GBTS) (VisitEngland) 2013
  • GB Day Visit survey (UKDVS) (VisitEngland) 2013
  • Understanding the value of engagement in culture and sport (DCMS, 2010)
  • ONS Mid-Year Population Estimates (ONS) 2013

To view the Guidance document which accompanies the tool, and to access the local economic tool, click here:
https://www.sportengland.org/research/benefits-of-sport/economic-value-of-sport/

Total sporting business stock

This data shows the total number of sports businesses between 2013 and 2015. The data uses the Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) definition of sporting activity from the Regional Insights project and makes use of data on 'local units' from UK Business Counts. This is a change from previous releases of the profile that used data sourced from IDBR. Due to this new methodology figures in this release are not directly comparable with those in previous iterations of the profile.

Figures are rounded to the nearest 5. Figures may be rounded down to 0.

Please note that the figures in the table may display marginal differences in totals due to this rounding.

Employment

This data shows the number of people employed in businesses involved in sporting activities or sporting manufacture in 2013, 2014, and 2015. The data uses a combined Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) and Standard Occupation Classification (SOC) approach (using the DCMS definition) to capture the entire sporting workforce.The data is from the Annual Population Survey, 2015.

Figures are rounded to the nearest 100. Figures may be rounded down to 0.

Please note that the figures in the table may display marginal differences in totals due to this rounding.

Neighbours

Nearest neighbours

The ‘Nearest Neighbour’ model was developed by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA) to aid local authorities in comparative and benchmarking exercises. It is widely used across both central and local government. The model uses a number of variables to calculate statistical similarity between local authorities. Examples of these variables include population, unemployment rates, tax base per head of population, council tax bands and mortality ratios.

For more information on the Nearest Neighbour model visit the CIPFA website:

http://www.cipfastats.net/default_view.asp?content_ref=18003

The CIPFA model does not yet cover Local Economic Partnerships (LEPs). In these cases, at present, the profile displays the nearest geographical neighbours to allow for some comparison of LEP areas. This may be refined in future updates of the Local Sport Profile. Currently this section is hidden when a LEP is selected.

Physical area (sq km)

The size of local authorities by square kilometre and size as a proportion of the national and regional area size. Data from the ONS.

Core Cities

Core Cities represent the local authorities of the eight largest cities in England outside London - the largest and most economically important English cities outside the capital. The Core Cities Group formed in 1995 to promote their common interests in a wide range of policy areas.

Glossary

APS Active People Survey or Annual Population Survey
CIPFA Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy
CC County Council
DCLG Department for Communities and Local Government
DCMS Department for Culture, Media and Sport
DDA Disability Discrimination Act
IDBR Inter-Departmental Business Register
IMD Index of Multiple Deprivation
LA Local authority
LEP Local enterprise partnership
ONS Office for National Statistics
SIC Standard Industrial Code
SOC Standard Occupation Code
* Data is suppressed for confidentiality purposes or for reasons of reliability
0 The entry for the variable is '0'

Suppression

Data Suppression

In some cases, a table may display an asterisk (*) instead of a data value. This means that the value has been suppressed due to confidentiality or reliability (sample size) issues. Generally, an asterisk indicates that the suppressed value is small, though above zero. In some cases, larger numbers may also be suppressed to avoid 'disclosure by deduction', where a single suppressed value in a table, row or column can be calculated from the total.

General Data Notes

Table Totals

Due to rounding, lower level geographies may not sum to the higher tier figures provided as table totals.

Local Enterprise Partnerships Figures

Aggregated figures for Local Enterprise Partnerships are necessarily calculated using a different methodology to county and regional figures; therefore, there may be marginal differences between geographically equivalent areas such as London the region and London LEP. For the Active People Survey indicators (excluding 'Adult (16+) Participation in Sport & Active Recreation (formerly NI8) by year, frequency and gender' and 'Any sports volunteering (LA and LEP)'), county figures have been substituted in the place of aggregated figures for their equivalent LEPs.